New Wife Series: Our Husband

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Click here for 👉Papa Married A New Wife (The Poem for the drama)

(A loud craaaackkk! sound is heard from the kitchen, Number 2 rushes from the sitting room to the kitchen)

 

Number 2 (hands on waist, facing the bent figure of Number 5 who is clearing broken pieces of the plate): So it’s you who have decided to break all the plates in the house?

 

Number 5: Haba it’s just— (stops mid-sentence as Number 2 raises her right hand)

 

Number 2: Will you keep quiet? Who gave you the audacity to talk back to me? (Number 3 walks in)

 

Number 3: What’s going on? (Looks at Number 5 with disgust)

 

Number 2 (claps hands & laughs mockingly): This thing thinks because our husband can afford plates she can break all the ones in the kitchen.

 

Number 3 (long hiss): Apa![i] Can you blame her? (Stretches to take something from the kitchen cabinet) They don’t have plates like these ones where she comes from.

 

(Number 5 clicks her tongue & carries on with cleaning the plates she had just washed)

 

Number 2: Disrespectful rat! It’s your mother at home you’re clicking your snake tongue at, not me.

 

Number 3 (Long hiss): Alaileko![ii]

 

Number 5 (abandons the plates then faces Number 3): Whom are you calling uncultured?

 

Number 3 (moves closer to Number 5 then pokes her chest with the plastic cup she took from the kitchen cabinet earlier): You! I’m calling you uncultured because it is what you are. You have no respect for those before you. You click your—

 

(Number 2 smiles as she watches the exchange between Number 3 and Number 5. Number 4 enters nods a greeting at Number 2, grabs a nearby stool to sit and watch)

 

Number 5: Those who deserve it not those who act like wild dogs earn respect! (She slaps off Number 3’s hand from her chest making the cup drop)

 

Number 2 and 4 (gasps at the same time): Mo gbe![iii]

 

(Number 3 makes her way to the kitchen door then locks it)

 

Number 2: This girl doesn’t know anything. (Pulls up Number 4 who reluctantly stands) We’ll teach you a lesson today!

 

Number 4 (mutters): I’d rather watch. (Number 2 glares at her) What? Why are you looking at me like that? Face the person who insulted you.

 

Number 3: Is it me you’re calling a wild dog? (Standing close to Number 5 who looks unbothered)

 

Number 5: Yes you! What will you do about it?

 

Number 3 (turns to Number 2 and Number 4 with a wide smile on her face): She’s asking what I’ll do about it. (Turns round to face Number 5 again) I will teach you what your mother didn’t teach you.

(Number 3 pulls Number 5’s blouse, then gives her a sounding slap)

 

Number 5 (holds her throbbing cheek then quickly grabs a stirring stick from the sink behind her): You’re just a frustrated mad woman! (She yells)

 

Number 3 (to number 4 and 2 without facing them): She says I am frustrated. She still has the mouth to talk and thinks that the stick she’s holding will stop me from touching her. (To Number 5) You are the mad and frustrated one. If you weren’t mad or frustrated because no man your age will marry you, tell me what you’re doing with a man old enough to be your grandfather?

 

Number 5: It’s none of your business you shameless old—

 

(Number 3 and 2 pounce on her before she could finish her sentence. Number 2 pulls her left leg making Number 5 land on her behind screaming, struggling and cursing. Number 3 collects the stirring stick from her and hits Number 5 with it severally before throwing it towards the door.)

 

Number 4 (half-heartedly as she opens a packet of biscuits): Stop fighting.

 

(Someone bangs on the kitchen door from outside while Number 3 and 2 deal with Number 5)

 

The voice: I said, open this door! Are you people crazy? Open the door!

 

Number 4 (grumbles as she makes her way to the door): They won’t let someone eat and watch this live drama in peace.

 

(Number 1 bursts in as Number 4 opens the door)

 

Number 1 (pulls Number 3 and 2 from a struggling Number 5): What sort of nonsense is this? What is wrong with you people?

 

Number 4: I told them to stop fighting but they didn’t listen to me (They all glare at her) What? Why are you looking at me like that? (Grumbles then exits the kitchen)

 

Number 1 (to Number 3, 2 and 5): Why have you decided to turn the kitchen into a mad house?

 

(Number 2, 3 and 5 talk at once)

 

Number 1 (irritated look): Will you shut your mouths?

 

Number 2 & 3 (together): But she broke—

 

Number 1: What if she broke plates? Are they yours? Did you bring them along when our husband brought you to this house?

 

Number 5 (mutters): Please ask them?

 

Number 1: What did you say?

 

Number 5: Nothing

 

Number 1(stares at 5 as she speaks): I am not in support of our husband’s lifestyle but do you see me acting like a mad woman? (To Number 2) You should put them to order not join in.

 

Number 2: Iyale mi[iv] I am not Jesus.

 

Number 1 (long hiss): You want to kill yourselves over a man who will marry another in seconds. I do not pity you. (Mutters as she exits the kitchen) He never picks the good ones. All he does is bring shafts and noisemakers for me to deal with. I wonder where he gets them!

 

 

 

[i] Vandal

[ii] Uncultured/ Can also mean disrespectful

[iii] I’m in trouble

[iv] Mother of the house

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Book Review: Segu by Maryse Condé

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“One day you’ll come to Segu. You’ve never seen a town like it. The towns here were created by the white men—they were born out of the trade in human flesh… But Segu—Segu is like a woman you can only possess by force.” Segu p.417

Segu is a brilliant piece written by Condé, which is rich in historical facts. Originally written in French and was translated by Barbara Ray—Kudos to the translator! Without her, I might not have had the opportunity to read this beautiful work of art. It was recommended to me last year when I put up a post about some of my favourite books; so glad I bought and read it.

The book has 490 pages and is divided into five parts. It begins in Segu (situated in present-day Mali), the capital of the 18th century Bambara Empire and in between, you get to visit distant lands. Through the desert you find your way to Timbuktu (also situated in present-day Mali), have brief encounters with the Ashanti Empire (present-day Ghana), a bit of flirtation with 19th century London, you even get to spend some time in Freetown and trace the edges of Lagos! (Situated in present-day Nigeria). How beautiful is that?

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Non- Fiction: Sweet Chocolate & It’s Dark Tale

“For most of us, chocolate is an indulgence synonymous with pleasure, but behind the sweet image of the cocoa bean there is a long history of exploitation, corruption, greed and slavery.”~ Bitter Chocolate, Carol Off

I didn’t plan to do a book review anytime soon but reading these two books for my dissertation to get background knowledge (Child Labour on Cocoa plantations in Cote D’Ivoire and the Harkin-Engel Protocol), was an eye-opener for me. If you are interested in gaining new knowledge or knowing more about the chocolate industry, where most of the cocoa produce come from, as well as situation of the producers, you might want to take a look at both ‘Bitter Chocolate: Investigating the Dark Side of the World’s Most Seductive Sweet’ by Carol Off (2006) and ‘Chocolate Nations: Living and Dying for Cocoa in West Africa’ by Orla Ryan (2011). They have their shortcomings (check out academic reviews on them) but you gain an insightful knowledge on certain alarming issues. The issue of dirty politics and exploitation (in all forms) in Africa, Latin America and other parts of the world today is not new to most of us but there are people who are not aware of the rate at which these things happen. I like chocolate but I never thought such sweet treat could have a twisted dark tale to its existence till I started doing my readings. I try so hard not think that our world isn’t messed up but the sickening truth is that it is and the denial of certain atrocities is saddening.

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